Usa Network Renews ‘covert Affairs’ For Season 5

Because, in his September 24 speech, Rouhani “repeated Iran’s demand that any nuclear agreement must recognize the country’s right under international treaties to continue enriching uranium.” That’s right, he is erecting “obstacles”: Rouhani said earlier Thursday that all nations, including Israel, should dismantle their nuclear weapons words that were taken as introducing obstacles to a nuclear deal. But are these conditions unreasonable, and are they really obstacles to an agreement? That depends on who you ask. If you talk to neoconservatives who’ve nursed a decades-long hatred of Iran, you get different answers than if you ask scholars of international law or conflict resolution. So USA Today asked two neoconservatives. First Michael Rubin of the American Enterprise Institute: Those comments show that Rouhani is not serious, said Michael Rubin, a former Middle East expert at the Pentagon under President George W. Bush. “The more you complicate the issue, the more you’re setting up the talks to fail,” he said. And then: Michael Doran, a former Middle East adviser in the Bush White House, said Rouhani’s words about Israel are “a wise negotiating strategy” to present Iran as a victim of a Western double standard. If you didn’t know better, you might take away that Rouhani was sly and intransigent. In fact, what Rouhani is calling for is exactly what the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty calls for. The NPT, signed by the US and Iran, says that Iran, like all signatories, has a right to enrich uranium for peaceful purposes, and that nuclear-armed nations must disarm. Citing an international law expert in the piece might have cleared that up, and perhaps even pointed out that the US is in violation of the treaty. But a look at USA Today’s Iran coverage over time suggests the omission, and the misportrayal of Rouhani’s remarks as obstacles, are not mistakes, but rather part of a pattern of putting Iran in a bad light, sometimes at the expense of the truth.

USA Boxing swings at Mike Tyson

“Mike, USA Boxing does not have the funds to compete with your offers,” the letter said. “If you have money and would like to assist these young athletes and the sport, you should donate for athlete stipends to support the training of these boxers and help your country regain its prominence on the medal stand. Please do not take them from us. If they win a medal for their country, you can always sign them to professional contracts at that time.” Tyson did not immediately return a phone call, and publicist Joann Mignano said he would not be commenting. Mignano confirmed, though, that Iron Mike Promotions signed Florida fighter Erickson Lubin on Tuesday, his 18th birthday. Lubin is a two-time Junior Olympic national champion and won the 152-pound division at the National Golden Gloves this year. In his USA Boxing bio, he said his goals were to win a gold medal at the Olympics, turn pro and win every title possible. “We want to be competitive and we want to increase our overall performance in the Olympic Games,” said USA Boxing executive director Anthony Bartkowski. “This is a new strategy of trying to make sure our Olympic-aged athletes are not poached by promoters. In the past, USA Boxing was passive and just accepted it.” Tyson isn’t the only promoter trying to lure amateurs to the pros. Last month, DiBella Entertainment said it signed highly touted 17-year-old Junior “Sugar Boy” Younan of New York to a contract and said he would make his pro debut in late October or early November, after he turned 18. Boxing promoters have long trolled the amateur ranks looking for talent, especially in recent years as the lure of Olympic gold has faded for many fighters. Winning in the Olympics was once a guaranteed way to make millions, but as U.S. Olympic boxing teams have faded so have the prospects for Olympic fighters. The last American man to win an Olympic gold in boxing was Andre Ward in 2004, and last year’s team in London didn’t even medal.

Covert Affairs Chris Gorham Piper Perabo - H 2013

With its intricate storytelling, diverse characters and authentic locations, the series continues to be a cornerstone in our line-up of USAs original signature dramas. The renewal comes mere weeks before Covert Affairs returns for the second half of its fourth season, which wrapped its summer run in mid-September. It was one of summers top 10 cable scripted shows, with nearly 4 million viewers. When Covert Affairs returns for the remaining six episodes, co-creatorsMatt Corman and Chris Ordpromise a “totally different show” following CIA Agent Annie Walker’s (Piper Perabo) decision to fake her own death and go deep undercover in her continued mission to topple Henry Wilcox (Gregory Itzin). “This change that we see in Annie at the end [of the finale] is a seismic one and a major one,”Corman told THR in September . “It’s going to launch us into a back six where we see a totally different Annie and a totally different show, and we hope people enjoy it.” “Every episode and every script we’ve been doing is exciting because we get to see a whole new side to Annie and how she operates and the choices she’s forced to make are a whole new chapter. She’s never been faced with many of these challenges and she doesn’t have the support system to help her. It’s very interesting how she copes with this new paradigm,” Ord told THR. Christopher Gorham, Peter Gallagher, Kari Matchett and Hill Harper star in the Universal Cable Productions series fromCormanandOrd, who are executive producers along withDoug Liman, David Bartis, Gene KleinandStephen Kay. Gorham will direct the fourth episode of the remaining half of the season. International locations featured this season include Medellin, Rome, Vienna, Copenhagen, Hong Kong, Grand Bahama Island and Geneva. Covert Affairs’ renewal comes as USA preps its big original comedy push following the syndication debut of Modern Family, and the return of veteran drama White Collar later this month. Suits is set to return for the back-half of season three in early 2014, with Royal Pains already renewed for season six, long-running comedy Psychreturning for season eight and rookie Gracelandpicked up for a sophomore run.The fate of Necessary Roughnesshas not yet been determined.

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